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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 247 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
fugate to do that and signed off on jeb bush to do this, there was this hangover from katrina going back in the bush administration and there's always been a point of emphasis, if you will, on fema by the obama administration. i think frankly it won't have mattered who came into the presidency in the post katrina world there was going to be an emphasis on fema. you weren't going to let that get politicized. yes, it's a political appointee and you're going to have somebody who came with a background to do this stuff. so i think that they realize that it's a high-wire act, this emergency management business. and most of the time if you do a good job it's good politics. if you blow it, it's really bad politics. >> i agree. >> it can be unrecoverable politics. so this is a case where good politics and good public policy and good management all converge. it's good politics to do a good job. you're not playing one side against the other. >> you know, i've always thought that the democrats being the government party because they believe in government more than republicans owe a greater debt, a
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacti sever states from dall the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of the day the expenses will be more than that. but yes, it's enough for now. what the president has de, he psident has done a prelandfa declaration of all of the states up the east coast. so that allows the administrator to move supplies in now, move people in now, rescue teams in, and to get ready, work with those emerg
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
hurricane katrina under george w. bush, it was an absolute disaster because the guys don't believe in government. so when you put them in charge of government, they do a horrible job. that shouldn't be surprising. now, romney and ryan say oh, no, it's okay. even if we're going to cut it by 40%, a romney-ryan administration will always ensure that disaster funding is there for those in need. period. now, isn't that great? that's just basically the same old romney-ryan lie. i'm going to cut it by 40% but it will be exactly the same. no it won't! you'll cut it by 40%. it will be a disaster, literally! and then we turn to noaa's analysis in 2011 of what the cuts would do. they say without data from the satellite closest to the end of its shelf life, the accuracy of its forecasts for major storms like blizzards and hurricanes would be decreased by approximately 50%. and that's not just hey i can't tell what the weather's going to be like or i can't exactly tell where the storm's going to hit. it has ramifications.
-team" and the damage from the storm, unprecedented. the total cost exceed that of katrina? liz macdonald joins us for a live report and also to assess what is likely in store for investors on wall street tomorrow as well. much more straight ahead. stay with us. ♪ [ male announcer ] do you have the legal protection you need? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any quesons. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. ♪ lou: well, what was once hurricane sandy continues to weaken tonight as the system makes it strike across pennsylvania into southern canada, the worst of sa
, unprecedented. the total cost exceed that of katrina? liz macdonald joins us for a live report and also to assess what is likely in store for investors on wall street tomorrow as well. much more straight ahead. stay with us. ♪ ♪ lou: well, what was once hurricane sandy continues to weaken tonight as the system makes it strike across pennsylvania into southern canada, the worst of sandy's winds are over as the -- what is now called the super storm heads, but windy conditions will continue over the great lakes into tomorrow. forecasters saying the higher elevations of northern west virginia could also get as much as 8 inches of additional snow overnight. well, the trail of destruction, as we reported to you at the outset, leaving at least 39 people dead in this country. more than 8 million customers are without power on the east coast and the economic effects will not be known for some time. joining us now to assess the impact that this circuit will have on the economy, we are joined by fox news editor liz macdonald. let's start with just the straightforward. i mean, the markets close
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
. afterrhurricanes katrina and read it, the fund was $18 billion in the hole and still has that debt. then there is the issue of management. the government accountability office wrote a stinging criticism of the agency just last year describing? as actuarially unsound. it's systems are antiquated, running on pen and paper and imagine that, rather than computers. the department's at local state and national levels as a result have a difficult time communicating with fema. according to that report because of many of the process is the manual, the culture have become dependent on individual people. staff relying on personal relationships to accomplish tasks. including -- concluded from the gao, a total revamp. maybe that is why the improperly paid nearly $100 million to hurricane victims after katrina and rita between 2005 and 2010. just earlier this month the agency waived its demands for repayment. altogether, 371 million was paid out in error. taken a reminder to everybody out there, that's our money fellow taxpayers. remember katrina trailers, 145,000 of them deemed unsafe because t
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
andrew and katrina. welcome, mr. dan tony. how do you think this storm is going to rank as compared with the biggest storm ever, which was katrina, in terms of insured losses, and andrew? >> well, katrina was an $80 billion insurance convenient, not take nothing consideration the economic impact as well. and a much different type of storm. the biggest problem with sandy it is a densely populated area of the country. early on in the claims process, i believe that the estimates of $20 billion range could be close. then you also have to look at the economic impact with the new york stock exchange being closed for two days, quite a few petroleum refineries shutdown along the east coast that could have an effect, as you had in an earlier broadcast that the airlines -- >> talk me -- >> thousands of flights. >> let's say i'm a small business owner, i own a pizza shop on the jersey shore or i own a dry cleaner out in queens that was damaged, what typically is covered under my business policy that i carry and what suspect? if it's flooding is it covered? >> unfortunately, flooding is an addi
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
. >> that would affect the residents of louisiana. energy policy is always on their minds after hurricane katrina and the bp oil disaster of 2010. that still has not changed their minds about wanting cheap sources of power. >> dean blanchard is known as the shrimp king of louisiana. he drives around barataria bay at high speed. and though it is hard to tell, things have slowed down for him leaping -- lately. in 2010, the oil spill paralyzed louisiana. since then, he is a shrimp king without shrimp. >> there is a lot of current that goes through here. the oil did not settle on the bottom. anytime the shrimp come through, they go in the park where there is no oil. >> on grand isle, there is oil as far as the eye can see. we are headed for one of the gulf's many oil rigs. dean steers through the petroleum slicks covering the surface. he is not against fossil fuels. >> [no audio] i believe in oil. half my family is in the oil business. i believe in cheap energy. the problem we got is will companies got so big they bought out all our regulatory agencies and bought up all our politicians. >> according
the state government do. what does a state government do? i ask that at the time of louisiana with katrina and the answer is not a whole lot. >> brandon, i just want to ask what good was fema during katrina? >> well, it was not good but it has done a better job here. you saw the governor praising and this is not a time of politics but a time to get it right and to respond to people's needs. the reason that the federal government needs help is because they can't afford it. >> they can't afford it. well, new york and new jersey have you seen their sell's tax. what do they do with all the money? they waste it. >> that's your governor. >> yeah, ours and both parties. look at fema. you know one reason that we keep fema, they make so much millions and billions get tossed in and those companies all have contracts and make a fortune and they need to keep fema. >> i hope that romney takes the tack that jack did. >> jack, how hard is it on mitt romney this day when chris is raving at how bam has been. >> well, chris christie, does not want romney to win. it's in his interest for obama to win. the in
. a few showers out of sandy. how will she rank all time? still the big question mark. hurricane katrina 108 billion in damage. hurricane katrina by far the all time costliest united states storm before sandy. >>announcer: ke was number two at one third of the cost. that was 26 billion. ike hitting houston. andrew in 92 hitting south florida. sandy now had 55 billionl plus. we have much more to go. the final total -- sandy could be the most costly. it'll be a top hurricane storm. some of that cost coming here, you haven't seen the -- the word is big time damage there. outstanding state and national parks. the sea shore, delaware, tough times getting through there. the bridge holding up okay but a lot of sand washing over the access roads here in route one and then of course here in garret where even pictures a little tough to come by. the whole state with the impacts from sandy obviously. 47 degrees right now. dew point 38, a quiet chilly kind of day and evening. nice evening to just stay in. 50 -- normal 62, watch -- sandy just shifted the weather pattern. we were talking about this, th
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
it was obama's katrina, which it is. the jobs report is up. we will check in with karl rove and look at predictions from others as the outcome of tuesday is now pretty much at hand. joining me with reaction to all of this, radio talk show host willie billy cunningham. his radio show is heard nationally across the country on sunday nights. sir, welcome back. ju you are a great american. >> sean hannity, how are you? >> sean: after the photo op,. billy cunningham where does president obama fly? to vegas. meanwhile, it it is beginning to freeze in the northeast. people don't have heat, electricity. the gas stations that are open people are waiting six hours or long are to be able to get gas. he comes to town. he hugs chris christie, photo op and then heads off to vegas. your reaction? >> i would say a few things. number one, i think this is obama's katrina in which he is showing a complete lack of compassion. i can recall a speech he gave in denver in front of 70,000 fans in which he said if you elect me the winds will stop blowing and the oceans will not rise. what happened to the anoi
this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some p
hurricane sandy that is hitting us now. better be prepared as we learned from hurricane katrina. not if you listen to the ryan-romney budget. we give them every benefit of the doubt on discretionary spending for the government. they don't specify, of course, because they're cowards. they don't say i'm going to cut this program this program this program. let's assume they do not cut fema any more than they would cut any other program. what would the fema budget under the ryan plan? well, it would be about $3.9 billion. let me did oh some quick math for you guys. that is $10 billion less from $13.5 billion to $4 billion. well, ryan is an extremist. that's not fair to look at his. let's look at romney's budget proposals stretching through 2015. what would he cut it down to? less $1.8 billion. it's even worse than ryan's budget. so if you are interested in getting a proper response through fema to these storms apparently you're not going to get one if ryan and romney get their wishes and desires and cut the hell out of our budget. this is a good time to be doing that. is that a smart move? and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 247 (some duplicates have been removed)